Wild Garlic Pesto

There is a large patch of wild garlic near where I live, about the size of a volleyball court. It is slightly hidden by a bush, but it isn’t tucked away, being just a few feet off a country path and yet nobody else seems to have discovered it. Or maybe they have, and just don’t know what it is…

More fool them, wild garlic is a highlight of spring for me, if only because it gives me the chance to make up a huge batch of wild garlic pesto.  I have made absolutely loads this year, which I have frozen in small quantities of a couple of tablespoonfuls each. It is absolutely divine mixed in with pasta with a little extra-virgin olive oil and a scraping of Parmesan, but it is also excellent for adding a mysterious, bright tang to soups and sauces, or just dilute it with extra-virgin olive oil and use as a dressing for salad.

It is so quick and easy to make there is absolutely no excuse for you not to try it, and it is one of those things that, once tasted, make you wonder why you ever bought pesto in a jar. The quantities given in the recipe make a large jar, if you want more just scale everything up in proportion.

Feel free to experiment with the nuts that you use, almost any nut will do the job – just make sure they are fresh otherwise their oils may be rancid, and make sure that the nuts that you use haven’t been coated or treated in any way, salty dry-roasted peanuts are delicious with a pint of beer but not so good in pesto.

wildgarlicpesto.jpg


RECIPE – Makes a large jar

100g wild garlic

50g Parmesan, finely grated

50g hazelnuts, skinned & toasted

extra-virgin olive oil

lemon juice, to taste

sea salt & freshly ground black pepper


METHOD

Wash the wild garlic thoroughly and pick out any foliage (and insects) that don’t belong. Place in a food processor and blitz until fairly well chopped. If you don’t have a food processor then you can do the job using a knife, and make the final paste using a mortar and pestle.

Add the Parmesan and blitz again, then add the hazelnuts. When the nuts are added you will need to have your olive oil handy; turn the machine back on, and add the olive oil while blitzing to your desired consistency.

Add salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste.

This will keep for a couple of weeks in the fridge, and several months frozen.

Kipper Chowder

I get strange looks when I mention this dish, I’m not entirely sure why because it is just a variation on the Scottish classic Cullen Skink. I threw this together last night after noticing a few packs of kippers in the freezer that were somewhat past their best-before date – 2 years past it in fact…

Before you ask the obvious question, nobody died. Kippers are smoked herrings, and smoking a fish is of course a method of preservation. It obviously works.

I urge you to give this a go: the combination of the creamy broth, the smoky aroma of the fish and the mild onion tang of the leeks is delightful. It’s quick to make and only cost me 55 pence – the cost of a packet of flat-leaf parsley – everything else I needed to make this was already in the house.

chow.jpg


RECIPE – Serves 2 generously

1 tbsp rapeseed oil

1 large or 2 small leeks, trimmed, washed and finely sliced

250g floury potatoes (Maris Piper, Roosters etc) peeled and diced into 1cm cubes

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

4 kipper fillets

2 tsp cornflour

850ml whole milk

2 bay leaves

a small bunch of flat-leaf parsley, chopped

a few chive stalks, chopped

the zest and juice of 1/2 a lemon

sea salt

freshly ground black and white pepper


METHOD

In a large saucepan, heat the oil then sweat the leeks over a medium-low heat, under a lid, until softened. This will take around 5 minutes.

Add the diced potatoes and garlic and cook for a further 3 or 4 minutes, stirring often.

Put the cornflour into a small bowl and add a little of the milk, stir thoroughly to make a thin paste. Turn the heat up and add the remainder of the milk to the leeks and potatoes, with the bay leaves. Pour the cornflour paste into the pan and stir thoroughly.

Bring the milk to a gentle simmer, stirring frequently, then cook gently for around ten minutes until the potatoes are just tender. The broth should be thick and creamy, coating the back of a spoon.

Meanwhile, take the skin off the kippers and chop the fillets into 2cm chunks.

When the potatoes are ready, add the fish to the broth, bring back to a simmer, then remove from the heat, cover and set aside for ten minutes. The fish will gently poach with no danger of it overcooking.

When ready to serve, add the chopped herbs and lemon juice. Stir thoroughly and check the seasoning carefully – you are unlikely to need much salt. Add a few good grindings of black pepper, and a little fresh ground white pepper as well (if you have it).

Serve with a little crusty bread, that’s all it needs.

Indian Spiced Potatoes with a Crispy Fried Egg

Eggs and potatoes, yum. Eggs and curry, yum. Eggs and potatoes and curry, yum yum yum!

I made this for the first time last Sunday for lunch, then again on Monday, and yet again last night (Tuesday) as a side dish with a curry feast. I think it’s fair to say that I love it, that my family loves it, and I bet you will too.

indianegg.jpg


RECIPE – Serves 4

800g floury potatoes (Maris Piper, Roosters etc) peeled and diced into 1cm cubes

6 tbsp rapeseed oil

1 tsp black mustard seeds

2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped

a fat thumb of ginger, finely chopped

1 tbsp curry powder

1/2 tsp turmeric

25g unsalted butter

6 spring onions, trimmed and finely chopped

1 long green chilli, finely chopped

1/2 tsp coarse sea salt

1 tsp nigella seeds

4 large eggs

a small handful of curry leaves


METHOD

First, prepare the potatoes: bring a large pan of salted water to the boil, add the diced potatoes and simmer gently for 13 mins or until just soft. Drain in a colander and set aside while you prepare the spice base.

Mix the curry powder and turmeric with a little water to make a paste. This will prevent the spices from sticking and burning when added to the pan.

Heat 2 tbsp of the oil in a large frying pan then add the mustard seeds. Cook over a medium heat until they just start to pop then add the garlic, ginger and curry powder/turmeric paste. Cook for 30 seconds or so, stirring constantly until aromatic, then add the butter.

When the butter has melted, add another tablespoon of oil and the potatoes. Fry for 5 mins, turning often and taking care not to allow the potatoes to disintegrate.

Add the spring onion, chilli and salt top the pan, stir and toss together for a minute or so then scatter the nigella seeds over the top, mix and transfer to warmed plates while you cook the eggs.

Line the base of a large frying pan with baking parchment, as you would if you were lining the base of a cake tin. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of oil over the top of the parchment, heat the pan, break the eggs on top and fry for a couple of minutes until thoroughly cooked and the bottom of the eggs are starting to crisp. This is a great way to cook a fried egg under any circumstances.

Place an egg on top of each mound of spiced potato, heat a tablespoon of oil in the frying pan and add the curry leaves. Fry for a minute or two until dark and glossy, drain on kitchen paper and serve on top of the eggs.

Wild Garlic and Spinach Soup

Spring is here in all but name, and with it comes one of the first delights of the year: wild garlic. Easily identifiable and quite prolific, it smells and tastes like a mild version of the more familiar garlic bulb. For hints and tips on how to find and identify it, see here.

wgarlic.jpg

The season is short, just a few weeks, and it is already out there so now is the time to gather a few bagfuls, search out as many recipes as you can and wow your tastebuds. It makes a marvellous pesto, just substitute wild garlic for the basil leaves, and I also blitz it up with a little olive oil to make a paste, which I then freeze in an ice cube tray to make handy drop-in condiments to enliven soups and light sauces.

Here is a quick and easy – and deeply delicious – soup recipe to get you started. It comes out a vivid emerald green and if it isn’t the freshest soup you will ever taste then I’ll eat my own arm.

To make it vegan just substitute 3 tbsp olive oil for the butter.


RECIPE – Serves 4

2 leeks, trimmed, washed and finely sliced

1 medium potato, peeled and diced

50g unsalted butter

a splash of olive oil

300g fresh baby-leaf spinach

200g wild garlic leaves

1 litre pale vegetable stock


METHOD

Melt the butter with a splash of olive oil in a large saucepan, add the leeks and potato and soften gently for 5 minutes or so. Add the vegetable stock, then simmer for 15 minutes until the potato is soft.

Add the spinach and wild garlic, put a lid on the pan and leave it for a couple of minutes to wilt down; you will probably need to do this a couple of handfuls at a time. When all the leaves are wilted, transfer it to a blender (or use a stick blender) to blitz it to a smooth soup. Check and adjust the seasoning, then serve. It’s as easy as that.

You can serve this soup with a poached egg on top, which adds a deliciousness creamy unctuousness and makes it suitable for a light lunch, or just with a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil and some toasted sourdough. You can also dress it with the flowers, which are edible and also delicious.